full

Episode 387 - Mainstream Media - mostly poisonous propaganda

In this episode, we discuss:

(00:00) 387

(00:41) Intro

(04:24) Religious Instruction

(13:12) AI Emails

(16:04) The Media

(30:15) Housing and Inflation

(47:27) Max Chandler-Mather. Watch him on Youtube (Insiders)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3dvn2nd5ZDA

(55:49) Ukraine and that dam

(01:10:02) Roger Waters

(01:17:02) Trump

(01:22:20) Essential Poll on The Voice

(01:23:58) Pat Robertson

(01:25:50) Hurley Burley

(01:27:30) Help

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Transcript
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Suburban Eastern Australia.

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An environment that has over time evolved some extraordinarily

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unique groups of Homo Sapians.

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But today we observe a small tribe akin to a group of mere cats that gather together

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a top, a small mound to watch question and discuss the current events of their city,

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their country, and their world at large.

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Let's listen keenly and observe this group fondly known as the

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Iron Fist and the Velvet Glove.

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I'm actually jealous of the mere cats because it's probably easy

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for them to identify good guys and bad guys as they're looking out.

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Yeah.

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In anyone who wants to eat them is probably a bad guy.

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Yeah, that's right.

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Things they want to eat.

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Let's heading that direction.

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It'd be simple, wouldn't it?

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It's not so simple in our world to identify the good and the bad, to sort

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out the wheat from the chf, to just get through the mountain of distraction lies,

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to work out who's Jesus and who is Satan.

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That's it.

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Yeah.

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It's not easy, but that's what we are here for on this podcast.

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That's our job is to, is to work our way through it and help you out, dear

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listener, because you are too busy.

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You'll work away nine to five.

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You've got other commitments.

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You can't read all of the shit that we have to read and all the posts and

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social media stuff that we follow.

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You're relying on us to provide a few guideposts, I guess.

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But Trevor, you and I don't agree on everything.

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That's true.

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At least well.

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Trying to find common ground.

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Yes.

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Common understanding.

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At least we, at least if we can find the truth of something mm-hmm.

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Then we can argue about the merits of things.

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I, I just, just getting to the truth is the hard part

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re-watched a, a eulogy to hitch.

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Yes.

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Yesterday actually.

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Yes.

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And one of his friends said you know, I, I often disagreed with 75% of what

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he said, but he was still friends.

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He actually enjoyed being challenged.

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Yes.

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And, and I think that's the important point, is that you can

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challenge and still be friends.

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Mm-hmm.

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And, and that you appreciate somebody challenging your point of view.

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I've actually enjoyed the last couple of weeks where you guys have been pushing

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back on the China Russias business.

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Mm-hmm.

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So quite enjoyed that.

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We were having a bit of disagreement, bit of to and fro saying, yeah.

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Anyway, I didn't think we actually disagree over China.

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I just think to myself that we've got to actually not restrain them, but manage

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their re rise, you know, because they are, they are getting, they are getting back

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to where they originally belonged for the last 18th centuries, outta the last 20.

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Mm-hmm.

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They were down below where they were, and now they've, they're starting

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to come back to where they were now.

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Mm-hmm.

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And I just think to myself, okay, that's fine.

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But I just think to myself, they've got to actually step back from Taiwan.

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That's all.

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All right.

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Well see, we do disagree on some things anyway.

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Exactly.

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Let's work our way through some topics, see where we agree and disagree.

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And what is, what's on the agenda?

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Well, we're gonna talk about religious instruction in Queensland.

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There's been a bit of stuff about that.

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And then really there was a bunch of topics that, to me, were all

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centered around our media and.

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What a poor job it's been doing, particularly in Australia.

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So a lot of things where, what's going on, a fair amount of the discussion is about

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how it's being treated in the media as in addition to what is actually going on.

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So if you're in the chat room, say hello.

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Who is in the chat room?

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We've got John and Andrew.

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Tanya and Mel here over the moment.

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Mel, good to see you there, Mel.

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So, right.

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Ah, she's the, well she was up there at the Mackay meeting.

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Was she?

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Yeah.

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She's one of our, one of the instigators.

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So, right.

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Or let's talk about religious instruction in school.

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So, we revealed a week or two ago that the Queensland Labor Party at its conference

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agreed unanimously that to have a policy that religious instruction lessons

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should either Be taken away out of school completely or alternatively that they be

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offered during lunchtime breaks or before or after school, not during school time.

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So that was a clever, a clever little thing to put in there as a

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way of, of appearing reasonable.

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And it is reasonable to offer them, you know, that's, that's still something

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that they shouldn't be allowed to do in a absolutely secular state

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school, but as a tactic of trying to get something through the parliament.

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Excellent move.

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Because of course, when the religious instruction lobby objects to it

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the answer is we can still do it, just do it before or after school

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because, you know, in America it, it's not even allowed in school.

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Yes.

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So look at our system and think they'd love to have it.

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Yeah, they have.

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So the, the, the religion.

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Mob have wet dreams about it.

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The secularists go, what the hell were you doing?

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What were you thinking of?

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Yes.

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Because kids associate school with knowledge and so they're

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coming here and they're getting assertions rather than knowledge.

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Yes.

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So yeah, you go to church for assertions, you go to school for knowledge.

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Yeah.

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Well anyway, so we had that, which was great.

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And we did think at the time, well, it's one thing to have a policy, it's another

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thing to actually have laws changed.

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And unfortunately it's been reported that Grace, grace living up to her

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name possibly has basically said she's got no intention of changing

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the law to match in with this policy.

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And it's also came out because there's been some great work in

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particular by a writer at the Career Mail, Mattie Holdsworth who's been

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writing lots of articles, which.

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Have quite succinctly put forward the secular case very well.

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I mean, we would've been dreaming for years about having a journalist

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like maybe Holdsworth at the Courier Mail doing what he's doing right now.

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He's doing a great job.

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So he's coming out with articles and the latest one was had a lady called Karen

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Gring and she's from the Queensland Christian Religious Instruction Network.

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She's the chair and she's not happy about the proposed change.

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I think there should be a g and E on the end of that Q cringe.

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Yes.

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Cringe cringing.

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Is that what you're saying?

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No, no, no, no.

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The Q C R I N.

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Right.

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Oh, I see the, an acronym.

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Yes.

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Anyway so.

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Also in this article, it talks how that the Queensland Teachers Union

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is, is in favor of the change.

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And also the state school principals association, Queensland Association

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of State School Principals.

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They've been very coy in the past and difficult to get any sort of commitment

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from in years gone by, as I recall.

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So I find it very encouraging and interesting that the Queensland

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Association of State School principals also backs the changes.

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Of course Karen living up to her name as a Karen must be

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terrible to be a Karen these days.

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Yeah.

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And as soon as you have a bit of a gripe about something mm-hmm.

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You're accused.

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No.

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What a Karen.

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Yes.

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It would be terrible, wouldn't it?

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Anyway, living up to her name, she she didn't like the compromise.

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Because, you know this is of doing it before or after school because she said

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it would mean the end of RI in Queensland.

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She says, when the Victorian government decided to do that, we know the numbers

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fell overnight, effectively killed.

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There would be no program.

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Ms.

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Grinning said, we don't want hundreds of thousands of parents to miss out

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on the important part of education.

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That is the consequence.

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So what she's basically admitting, as we all know, is the kids don't wanna

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really do these things and they're not going to give up their lunchtime.

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Also, the parents, 99.9% of the time would not be interested in getting their kids

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to school early or picking 'em up late so they could attend a before or after class.

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So she's effectively admitting that the Victorian experience would be replicated

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here, that the kids and the parents.

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If they have to put in a modicum of effort, we'll not want to do it, and

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the whole rock shadow will collapse.

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And she says that without Yes.

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B awareness.

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She's all about values.

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Yes.

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Because people can't have values without being indoctrinated.

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Sorry, be instructed in religion.

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Yes.

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She also tried to run the argument that the people, all the children who don't

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go to religious classes they get some valuable religion revision and quiet

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reading time that's very valuable to them that they'd be missing out on.

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So she's trying to say that this downtime with kids are twiddling their thumbs

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would, would be lost or ludicrous.

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The problem is, of course, if you look at the comment section on

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the Curia mail with these articles they've been pretty heavily in favor

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of religious instruction continuing the way it has, because guess what?

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The average reader of the courier male is is that sort of demographic.

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So unfortunately if Grace, grace is paying attention to the comment section, then she

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will be, have a full sense of entitlement yes, to keep it as it is and be scared

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to change it because she will go, oh no, all the comments section are against it.

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I better not do anything like possibly she thinks that way.

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Who knows?

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Really surely in the Labor party.

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Now, if you are criticized in the courier mail or you are criticized

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by commentators in the courier mail, you should see that as a green light

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for a thing you should do, because exactly, it should be a signal to you.

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But that's something you should do.

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If the courier mail's telling you not to or the people are telling you not to, it's

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probably something you should do anyway.

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That's where we're at with religious instruction.

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It will be interesting to see what pressure can come to bear on

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Grace, grace over this issue by Labor party colleagues, I guess.

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Sounds like next election.

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We're all out in her electorate, campaigning for the greens.

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Absolutely.

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We are.

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Absolutely.

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We are.

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We are going to make contact with whoever the Greens candidate

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is and we will be offering as much support as we possibly can.

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Because the Greens, of course, have a policy of getting rid of this RI and

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Grace Grace's electorate is one of those that's in danger of the greens.

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Taking it over.

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You should see that.

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Hmm.

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Anyway, right in the chat room.

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What's been happening there?

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Let me just, why can't I scroll on this chat and see what's been happening?

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Why isn't that scrolling?

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Oh, no, why?

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Let me go back to here.

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Okay.

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Let me see.

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Yes, and Mel, we are gonna help on the Sunshine Coast as well.

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Actually Julia says the comments section on previous articles have

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a majority saying, get it out.

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That's good.

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That's what she said.

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Check out the videos.

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20th.

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There's some links there to some videos that Julia is aware of.

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And John says he knows a couple of Karens and they prefer Kaz now.

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Yeah.

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Julia says principles have wanted changes since 2015.

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Okay.

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And hello to Allison's mother, Bev.

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Now also asked, did we pick up on the orcas at State conference?

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No we didn't.

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So presumably the state conference said they didn't like the sound of orcas.

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I would hope Is that same?

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Hopefully they said stage three task cut tax cuts were crap as well.

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Yeah, yeah.

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Let us know, Mel, what the story was with orus at that stage conference as well.

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Alright, so in the chat room, you're firing away already.

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Good to see.

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Before we move on to more of my media stuff, is it a

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strange buzzing coming through?

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Yeah, it's Scott's fridge, that's my refrigerator.

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It's just turned on.

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Okay.

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Okay.

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Sorry about that.

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No, it's all right.

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Joe, you were concerned about AI and Christian email campaigns.

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What's the story?

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So I was listening to a podcast.

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Science versus, which generally dials into delves into controversial matters.

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And this time was AI and how it was gonna end the world.

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And shock horror up it isn't.

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Mm-hmm.

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But they did say one of the most concerning things was the ability

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to generate convincing sounding letters to generate a flood of

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replies on a controversial issue.

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And they'd taken a bunch of generated and real letters to some politicians in

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the US and they couldn't tell which ones were generated and which ones weren't.

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Hmm.

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And so there's a very real possibility that with a bit of knowledge, you could

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generate an email campaign as a single person and generate hundreds or even

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thousands of e emails to politicians pretending that their electric cares about

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an issue that really isn't of interest.

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Yes.

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And, and knowing that the a c l engage in these huge letter writing campaigns

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where they just dump out the same form letter over and over to the point where

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I think it was the voluntary assisted dying, said we ignored the form letters

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and took 'em all as a single letter.

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Yes.

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The in future they could be using this to auto-generate non-standard form letters.

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So still a form letter, but it doesn't look like one which would

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make it seem like considerably more of a groundswell than it really is.

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Maybe it will so discredit the email lobbying sort of industry that people

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will be tempted to just ignore email campaigns if it is such a chronic issue.

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I, I think maybe in the long run.

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Mm.

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But in the short term, there's a, a very high possibility that yes.

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And I think, I think you're right there, Joe.

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I just think to myself, in the short term, you're gonna have a hell of a

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lot more of this sort of nonsense.

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Whether they're going actually just sign, try and flood their email inboxes.

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That's all given that the Christians think it could, I think it could actually

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work in their favor in the short term, but in the longer term, I think Joe's

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right, that you just, I think Trevor's right, they'll start to ignore it

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after about six or 12 months, given that the email campaigns, normally the

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Christians outnumber the secularists.

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Mm-hmm.

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Maybe it's an opportunity for the secularists to use

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the ARI to even up the field.

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I know that it's one of those things that we, we, you know, it's just

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that you're gonna get into an arms race with them who can actually fund,

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who can fund the inboxes faster.

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Yeah.

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Yeah.

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Yeah.

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Yeah.

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Oh, well, we'll see what happens with that one.

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All part of an interesting world.

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So, oh, look, as I was going through these topics, I got quite

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depressed and negative, so let me pass on some of that to you.

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Well, I was listening to James O'Brien talking about Boris Johnson.

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And Boris Johnson has resigned and, and his fuck off letter.

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Yes.

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Basically blaming everybody except himself and saying it was

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a completely undemocratic process.

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The inquiries that have been against him, all to do with the parties that were held

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at Downing Street during lockdown period, and his array of lies that he spewed

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forth in, you know, once hints of this came out and really just caught out and.

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You know, as James O'Brien was explaining it, there is a committee

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looking at his behavior, which is a majority conservative committee.

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The parliament is still majority conservative.

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The worst that would happen is that they would recommend some sort of

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by-election take place, and then it would be up to his constituents who are

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majority conservative to boot him out.

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So for him to say the whole process is undemocratic beggar's belief, what he

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means is he's a privileged, spoiled brat.

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And he doesn't like being held to account.

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Correct.

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I think he's right.

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He's, he's jumping now and so he can say the whole thing is a kangaroo court.

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Mm-hmm.

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And so I was, I was listening to that and really to any observer looking at

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Boris Johnson from the get-go, you just have to go, this guy is a lion prick and.

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Trump was the same.

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You just had to look at him and listen to him for five minutes and know

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that he was a conman snake salesman who was only interested in himself.

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Yeah.

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But I don't understand how he's still the front runner in the

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Republican nomination race because it's all politically motivated.

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It's all a plot to take him down.

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It's all tribal.

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It's tribal.

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It's tribalism will excuse anything.

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Mm-hmm.

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That's what it's come down to.

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Yeah.

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But you do have a number of other people up there who are trying to take him down.

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It's just I don't understand why.

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I mean, Ron DeSantis is, is an idiot, but you know, you do have a

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few others there that are possibly a hell of a lot better than him.

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Mm-hmm.

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Well, he's created his own tribe, the Trump tribe.

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Remember he's taken over the Republican party and.

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Refashioned it as the Trump party, and the other people are Republicans are

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trying to just nibble away at the edges.

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So, you know, tribalism.

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And then, you know, lately with this sort of Brittany Higgins saga, which I will

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not be talking about you're free to now.

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Well, just except for this one moment right now.

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Remind kept reminding me of Scott Morrison and, and he was also

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to my mind, obviously a liar.

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And a charan.

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And a buffoon.

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No, no, no.

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None of them were liars.

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They were bullshitters.

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The difference is a liar knows that it's a lie.

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Yes.

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And cares about the truth.

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Right.

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A bullshitter doesn't care what the truth is.

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What they say is what serves them at the time.

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Yeah.

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Well, that's true.

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Yes.

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And, and, and they were all bullshitters.

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So there's certainly a common thing about these guys, guys, as you look at them.

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To me.

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Buffoons, blustering, stupid, selfish, buffoons, full of chutzpah, which is

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extreme self-confidence or audacity comes from the back of the throat.

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It's chutzpah.

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Thank you.

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Or the Hebrew lesson y Yiddish, I think y Yiddish.

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Yes.

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Their only talent was self-promotion and self-preservation, and they

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invariably relied on a thin veneer of lies and tribalism, the three of them.

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And the thing is, they got away with it for so long because they just weren't

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scrutinized by the media properly.

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And we just have Trump, Trump got so much and Trump became the leader

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because he got so much free press.

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They, they looked at the amount of press he got before the 2016 election.

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Yes.

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And said if he'd had to pay for that, that would've been worth hundreds of millions.

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Yes.

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Well, okay.

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That's just another example of how the media has not worked the way it should

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to expose these snake oil salesman.

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The complete failure of the media, if its job is to inform

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people of what's going on.

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But I, I think they no longer think that they now think that their job is to

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pick aside well set agendas, set policy.

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Yes.

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They, they think their role is to to drive the populace into persuading politicians.

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That's what it's become.

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Certainly for the privately owned media.

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For example, even, even the state owned media to an extent.

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Mm-hmm.

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Mm-hmm.

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Which way are they driving people, Jane?

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BBC abc, I, I, I think they are undecided.

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I see they are a lot on politics.

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They're afraid to call out the right for, for what they are.

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But on social issues mm-hmm.

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I see that quite often they are very left-leaning.

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Yes.

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Okay.

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They'll drive a left wing bedroom issue, won't thinking, well, welcome to country.

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Yes.

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As an example.

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Mm.

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And, and or any of the gay rights and marriage equality.

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Yeah, yeah, absolutely.

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Transgender and all that.

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Yeah.

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Yep.

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They'll drive that.

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That's true.

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But, but politically they really don't hold politicians to

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account around climate change.

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No.

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True.

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And, and other political issues.

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That's because the powerful people.

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Don't really care too much about marriage equality and transgender issues.

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These make up a good distraction to keep the masses occupied.

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But the things that are important to them, especially oil companies, for

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example, don't want climate change.

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And rich and powerful people don't want, you know, income inequality dealt with

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or other, no major changes like that.

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So, so the ones that the abc, the publicly owned media will drive are things that

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powerful people don't care too much about.

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Anyway where was I going with this?

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So, obviously private owned sectors captured by powerful interests,

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the families who own them, but the public sector, the ABC is captured

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by the same powerful oligarchs.

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So they fill the board positions, Ida Buttross, and the other

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cronies on the ABC board.

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They feel the comparing roles.

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If you look at David Spears, pat, Patricia Cavalla, Stan Grant, these

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are all right-wing corporate types.

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Any honest independent journalists risk losing, access to scoops via leaks.

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If they rock the boat, the smart ones have already left.

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The ones left behind who are not right wing insurgents are timid

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dullards who don't understand and can't provide analysis.

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I think the analysis on the ABC is pathetic at the moment and the way

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James O'Brien was talking about the bbc, it sounds like it's no better.

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There's no analysis.

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So the only time they introduce ideas outside of a narrow Overton window is when

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they allow crazy right wing panelists like Greg Sheridan to give a right wing view.

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And the effect is to shift the Overton window a bit more to the right.

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It, it's like this nonsense that he's got written here.

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You know, Boris and Trump targets of undemocratic attack, the la persecutions

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of both Donald Trump and Boris Johnson.

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Demand designed to make sure they never come back as shocking.

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Yes.

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You know, I, I can't understand how someone who has a brain on their

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shoulders could suggest that either of those men are being persecuted, like

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they've been given such a free ride.

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Yeah.

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Yeah.

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That's Greg Sheridan.

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He's an idiot.

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Yes.

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As marquee lawyers described, he's, he's entered the weird uncle phase of his

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career, but he's been there a while.

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Next week the ABC will have him on, I know, on some panel

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somewhere, and not him either.

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No.

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Give us your viewpoint.

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And he'll give his extreme viewpoint and that that will

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be part of what its acceptable conversation in the Overton window.

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But they never have anybody from the socialist Democratic Party or some other

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extreme left when it comes to economic issues or, or climate change issues.

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They're just, anyway, that's the abc.

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It's, it's been taken over.

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So, so what do we do?

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So to understand people need to read, but who's got the time?

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Who can avoid the distractions that cripple our attention?

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Like, I have to do this podcast every week, so one reading stuff,

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but I'll often get distracted way too much by social media and get

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taken away from more in-depth things.

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It's not easy to avoid all of these bells and whistles and read something

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of significance and difficulty and try and understand an issue.

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And look, while I'm on this topic, I am going to provide a little bit of a video

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from James O'Brien who was maybe I'm not actually, this is by Roger Waters.

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Mm-hmm.

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Okay.

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So he's been in the news lately because he's been accused of antisemitism

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and he had quite a good rant explaining why he's not antisemitic.

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But he had a good in his rant, there was an interesting passage I

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thought about how do we understand topics and learn about things.

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I'll play this one for you just to break up my monologue.

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Here we go.

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A lot of my political ideals have hosted through this, mainly following my mother.

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She once said to me when I was struggling with something or other, she

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said, Roger, through your throughout your life, you're gonna come up

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with all kinds of naughty problems, things that you have to wrestle with.

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This is my advice to you.

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Read, read, read, read, and then read some more.

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Find out everything there is to know about whatever the question might be.

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However long it takes when you've done that, you've done all the heavy

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lifting, the hard work is over.

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What do I do then, mom, she said Next bit.

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It's easy.

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You just do the right thing.

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You know it's not hard.

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But you do have to do the reading and you cannot believe what the BBC tells

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you cuz it's completely a mouthpiece of government and the ruling class.

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You are not being told any of the truth.

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So what I would suggest you should do is like my mother would suggest

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you do, and read, read, read, and don't read The Daily Mail.

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Or The Guardian.

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The Guardian.

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What is our guardian of, Ugh.

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Read what people who know about these things have to say.

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That's the other thing, isn't it?

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You gotta be careful what you read.

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Mm-hmm mm-hmm.

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Head down some rabbit holes and you could be believing all sorts of crazy stuff.

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Gotta read critically.

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That's the thing.

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You gotta be able to evaluate the credentials of the writer and

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the strength of their arguments.

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People need to argue, talk, discuss about our civilization and

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how it's being organized, but we don't, it's impolite to talk about

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news, politics, sex, and religion.

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I remember again, going back to hitch him talking to someone and there

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is a classic putdown of his, and he says, it strikes me, I'm sorry to

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have to say this, that you have read nothing of your opponent's position.

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Mm.

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And he said, effectively, if you can't succinctly put your

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opponent's position into words, you shouldn't be having the argument.

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Mm.

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Yeah.

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You should know both sides of the argument before you have it.

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Mm-hmm.

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In the chat room, are you having dinner parties, meetings with people?

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Will you actually argue stuff with people about, I reckon Mel does.

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Surely you know, I feel like I go to things.

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I went to a function of 60th birthday on Sunday at this brewery in

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Brisbane, and introduced a few topics.

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You were being the weird uncle again, weren't you?

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Yeah, I was.

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I feel like I'm the only time people ever come across these discussions.

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Like this guy started to say about Russia blowing up the dam.

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And I said, well, how do you know they did anyway?

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They kicked something.

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Sorry.

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Yeah.

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In the chat room, tell me, do you have discussions where you actually talk about

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the sorts of things we talk about on this podcast with people and argue and discuss?

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I'm, I'm interested to know.

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I think, I think there's a lack of it.

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So, all I get is a work meetings.

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Oh, God chose off on one of another, one of his friends.

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Yeah.

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So if people couldn't see through Schmo Johnson or Trump obvious

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charlatans, how are they meant to evaluate even simple policies?

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How is the average person, I suppose to look at the house crisis at the moment?

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House prices, rents you know, they might hear something like

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oh, let's give people access to their superannuation to buy houses.

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Like that's gonna come up over the next 18 months.

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And I think it's a really bad idea cause it's just gonna lead

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to increased prices fairly.

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Sure.

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Juice media, honest government ads did a thing about that.

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Did they?

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Yeah.

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Mm-hmm.

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Again, at this 60th birthday, we got to house prices and somebody

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said, well, it's all about supply and demand and sort of walked away.

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Cause I wasn't actually in the mood, but okay.

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Supply demand plays a, a role, but with housing you've got interest rates.

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Low interest rates leading to people borrowing the maximum they can borrow

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from the banks, increasing the price.

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You've got vacancy rates we talked about where there was like a million

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properties on census night that were just vacant, which we haven't had before.

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We've got our tax laws that incentivize people to have multiple properties.

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We've got a culture in Australia of home ownership that is quite strong

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compared to some other countries.

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And we've got record low public housing, construction.

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Like there's a whole bunch of issues in there that as nuanced

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and complicated and intertwined.

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It's just not easy for people.

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You need to do a lot of reading to get across all of those things.

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It's not easy.

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So, in the chat room Mel says, most of my robust discussions are with

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colleagues, mostly conservative, but usually well informed, and

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it helps me hone my arguments.

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Lol.

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So Andrew watches a run on YouTube.

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Dunno what that is.

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Ron says, I'm finding these days people just want to hold forth.

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They don't want to discuss.

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Mm-hmm.

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I hope I'm not holding forth these things.

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I tend, I like to think I listen to people.

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Julius says people don't wanna think about the tough stuff

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and I think she's right there.

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It's, it's true.

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I, I remember my daughter as, as a little one asking questions and I'd

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say, you know, what do you think you, what, what information do you have?

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I don't know, dad, just give me the answer.

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Right, right.

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That was like tough man.

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Talking about the Asian student was encouraged to talk about something and

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he said, just tell me what to say, right?

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Yeah.

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Where am I getting to with this rant?

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So yeah, our leaders have improved since Morrison Trump and Johnson, but not by

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much a powerful, rich, and religious.

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Haven't lost anything.

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The powerless haven't gained anything.

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The blatant lies and tabloid shit.

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Fuckery may have eased, but the policies haven't changed besides bedroom issues.

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The parties are the same.

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So I always like this quote from Chris Hedges about whether there's a difference

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between the Democrats and the Republicans.

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He said, well, of course it's a difference.

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It's how you want your corporate fascism delivered to you.

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Do you want it delivered by a Princeton educated Goldman Sachs criminal,

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or do you want it delivered by a racist nativist, Christian fascist?

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And we've certainly got the the Christians here in our.

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Liberal national party.

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Ah, look, finally, there's a, besides the housing crisis, Scott, there's a recession

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coming and Albanese is going to own it.

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Mm-hmm.

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I reckon, and at the next election, people may not understand all the economic issues

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in details, but they're gonna feel pain.

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And I think they're gonna see the greens are offering meaningful relief.

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Really?

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Yes.

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Because the Australians already been touting that we're in a recession.

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So the Austral, it was one of the Murdoch rags.

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Mm-hmm.

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I, I saw the headline, something about Australian recession.

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Mm-hmm.

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And I thought, yeah, what a surprise.

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Right wing media, left wing government.

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Well, it was close.

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The, the quarter that's just finished was like 0.1 of a percent.

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I know it was very pitiful.

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It was a very pitiful for performance and God knows why.

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The RBA thought that, oh, now's the time to jack up interest rates again.

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Yeah.

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Point two of a percent GDP growth was 0.2 of percent for the margin quarter.

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They, they're really worried about inflation.

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Yes.

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Yeah.

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Okay.

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Well, the only way it achieve in by jacking up interest rates as

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far as they have now, it's only you know, it's maybe we can start

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increasing taxes on corporate profits.

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I agree wholeheartedly.

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You know, that that would be the, probably the smarter way to do

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it, but you're not gonna be able to get the government to do that.

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It's one of those things.

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I just think to myself, the only way that they're going to actually

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bring demand under control is to have a lot of people put outta work.

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Now it's already resulted in what was it called?

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It was called a recession of the households or something like that.

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They reckon that the households had to cut back their own expenditure

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to the point that they're saying that it's recessionary type.

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Of that sort of expenditure.

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It's one of those things God knows why they are just got their

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blinkers on, and that is still driving up the interest rates.

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Well, would you like to hear from the Reserve Bank governor and to

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hear exactly what he had to say?

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Yeah, I know what he's gonna say.

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Here he is.

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And those calculations that you referred to were based on the assumption

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that people made no adjustments.

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So if people can cut back spending or in some, some cases find additional

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hours of work, that would put them back into a positive cash flow position.

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It's not to say that there's not very significant stress out there

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and households at the moment.

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But as I showed in the chart here that arrears rates remain low, people are

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affording to, to pay their mortgages even as they roll off from the fixed

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rate loans to variable rate loans.

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The arrears rates remaining low, but.

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The banks are telling us, and this is understandable, that people are

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having to cut back and sending.

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And I think that's going to be that the environment we're operating

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in a while for a while yet people will make their mortgage payments,

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but they have to cut, they'll be cutting back, sending in other areas.

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So I'm, I'm hearing he's saying, put food on your table, don't pay your mortgage,

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and then the r b will cut into his rates.

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Yes.

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I think what he is actually saying is that, you know, he, he's basically making

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a what's the word I'm grabbing for that?

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He's making a, a He's trying to justify his position of jump jacking

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up the interest rates the way he has.

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He said that it's going to impact your expenditure outside

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of your mortgage payments.

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Mm-hmm.

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So you can, you can still put food on the table.

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You can still buy your kids new shoes, but you can't buy them the expensive shoes.

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You've gotta buy them the cheap shoes and you gotta spend as

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little as humanly possible.

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And that is the whole point.

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It is just one of those things.

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It is starting to hurt now though, and as the interest rates go up

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and as the mortgage payments go up, it's going to hurt even more to the

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point that people are going to then eventually end up selling their homes

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and they're going to not get as much for them as they were hoping for.

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Yeah.

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There's still a lot of people on fixed cheap rates that

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haven't gone the variable yet.

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They are going to, I think they're calling that the cliff, aren't they?

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They're saying that they're gonna fall off that cliff this year.

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Yeah, so our RBA refuses to accept that increased corporate profits

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has a significant effect on this, and they're basically blaming wages

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and apparently in their report.

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According to an article by Bernard Keen in Crikey, he says, the report in

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devoted an entire section of its most recent statement on Monterey policy

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to discrediting the argument that profits played a significant role.

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So our reserve bank is focused on blaming wages for inflation, but

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according to Bernard, keen and Crikey elsewhere in other countries, central

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banks are actively engaged in the debate about the role of profits.

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So, let me just see here.

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The European Central Bank released research showing that the latest

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increases Driven by both unit labor costs and unit profit unit profits.

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Unit profits increased by 9.4% in the fourth quarter and contributed more than

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half of the domestic price pressures.

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So European Central Bank is acknowledging the role of corporate profits, whereas

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our reserve bank is refusing to.

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And the European Central Bank president went further and said, sectors have taken

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advantage to push costs through entirely without squeezing on margins, and in some

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cases pushing prices higher than justified by the, the cost of their inputs.

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So the, there was another country there I think as well that had a similar thought.

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Let me just, lots of them used the lockdown.

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It's a layoff staff.

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Yes.

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And then complain of that increased costs, pass that onto consumers.

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Yes.

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When actually running at reduced costs.

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Yes.

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One of the arguments you'll see is that, okay, there's been increased

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profits in business in Australia when you look at a chart, but a lot of that

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is in the mining and energy sector and separate to the rest of the economy.

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And Bernard Keen says, well, okay, if we admit, if we forget about energy, what

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other structurally important inputs?

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And Steve Adore profits have soared.

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Coles and Woolworths have enjoyed surging profits.

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The banks have enjoyed higher profits Qantas higher profits.

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Mm-hmm.

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Department stores higher profits, so.

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In the spirit of John Cleese he says apart from energy, freight, construction,

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materials, groceries, interest rates, airfares and retail where is the

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so-called profit driven inflation?

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That's a good line from Bernard King.

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So, so yeah, our reserve bank, ignoring profits, other reserve banks are accepting

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that they're playing a role in inflation.

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And if you see the argument, well, it's all about the resource

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energy sector, super profits.

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Remember all those other sectors that have had strong profit growth, it's

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gotta have some impact on inflation, but nobody's gonna address that.

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It seems, I could have sworn though, read something today that they reckon that the

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outrageous profits and that sort of stuff that the mining companies were making are

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on the way down because the The per ton price of coal and the barrel of oil has

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gone back down dramatically, hasn't it?

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I think some of that has, yes.

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I, I'm not sure what commodity prices.

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I think some of that has dropped down.

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Yeah.

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Yeah.

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But here's what I like about Crikey, at least on this one, is okay, that was a

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argument run by Bernard Keen in Crikey.

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And then there was another argument run by Adam Schwab also in Crikey,

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basically saying, eh, Bernard Keen's sort of exaggerating what

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the real cause of inflation is here.

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He's missed the real point, and I'm about to explain what he suggests the real point

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is, but I think it's quite refreshing that in the same publication you've got

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people solve a problem, but having a different view and you just gotta work

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your way through and try and figure out who's right and So he admits that Keen was

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correct in a sense that some businesses are making the most of the situation

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and fattening their profit margins.

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He said in normal times, unless you've got a monopoly, a business that tries

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to increase prices is gonna lose market share as customers switch to competitors.

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But what has happened recently is that businesses without monopoly

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pricing have been able to increase prices without losing customers.

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And the reason is that following the global financial crisis, we

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had a decade of gluttony where debt levels massively expanded.

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And in 2020 when the economy should have contracted, covid came along and

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governments lost their collective minds.

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Encouraged by much of the media politicians chose to lock up their

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population, which had the effect of significantly slowing economies.

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And to avoid being voted out by people, governments undertook the

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most aggressive fiscal stimulus in modern history in Australia.

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290 billion was created and handed to all sorts of people,

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and that didn't get returned.

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When the pandemic ended, all that money remained in the system.

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So inflation, he says in its most basic form, is too much

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money chasing too few goods.

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So the covid related stimulus created a torrent of cash.

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And unlike previous decade of monetary policy largely causing asset prices

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to skyrocket it materialized in higher consumer goods and service costs.

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So cust corporations have been able to fatten their profit margins because

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their customers have more money to spend.

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That's an interesting.

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Angle to it.

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I, I, I disagree.

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I think.

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Mm-hmm.

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The, the, the biggest benefits of Job Keep was Qantas was hard, hardly

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normal, who did really, really well.

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Mm-hmm.

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By the average people not being able to get out, I don't think it

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created zombie businesses at all.

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I think a lot of small businesses died out.

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I think the zombie businesses were Harvey Norman and Qantas, and, and the

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ilk who got huge amounts of government money and the people who needed it, you

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know, I, I think the 12th man needed it.

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I, I think that was one of his major arguments against the lockdown was

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that he suffered personally and he wasn't seeing government large s it

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was the, the corporations that saw the, the large s and note that got

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that money hasn't been paid back.

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I think I agree with you, Joe.

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I don't think it did trickle down to the consumer level.

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I think it stayed at the corporate level.

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Yep.

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So probably Keen's correct.

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And swabs probably incorrect.

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Well, I, I, I think the government bailouts could well be the cause

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of the inflation, but they'd never got to the poor people.

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Yeah.

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But you know, and that's all punishing the poor people is the wrong place.

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You should be going after the corporations.

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Yeah.

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There would different sectors in the boomer sector.

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Let's, let's pick on baby boomers again.

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Mm-hmm.

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Who have had their asset prices increase mm-hmm.

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And their superannuation, you know.

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Okay.

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They haven't been spending money on overseas holidays and they've had

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their sort of, every Boomer I know is currently overseas at the moment.

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They're all, they're all there.

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They're, Facebook is littered with people.

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Mm-hmm.

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In Europe traveling around.

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So I think there was a bit of pent up money to be spent by those people

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who weren't going on holidays.

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There was a lot of holiday money, for example.

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Yeah.

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Unspent that went into vehicles, people bought caravans and yeah,

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there was a big shortage of vehicles.

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I, I think some sectors would've benefited from, from boomers having

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spare money that they couldn't spend as they were locked up.

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I think there's a little bit of that at some point, but yeah, you, you're right.

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The general Joe Blow.

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I, I, I think not traveling into the city, not commuting five days a week

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what's it, $8 a day in train alone?

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Yep.

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So $40 a week, times that by 50 weeks, two grand a year.

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So it's another two grand in my pocket, which was discretionary spending.

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Mm-hmm.

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And, and yes, of course there was the need to upgrade the home office.

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Mm.

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Because I'm working from home now, so I, I think spending patterns did shift, but

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I don't know that people had more money.

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Mm-hmm.

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Anyway, good to hear some arguments about what's going on.

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Dear you listener, if you get the show notes, read through it yourself and figure

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it out as to who you reckons most likely.

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Correct.

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Okay.

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I think there's gotta be a bit to both of those arguments.

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Mm.

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Yeah.

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Now, just backtracking, if you guys are with the notes, head

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back to Greg Sheridan's picture.

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Mm-hmm.

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Back up that way because ABC has lost its way and Green's mp, max Chandler Mather

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appeared on the Insiders Program and.

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David Spears was questioning the questioning Max about their housing

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policy and I've got a link on the show notes or just Google it, you'll find it.

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He was, he was, his view was always, well, if you do that, then this

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terrible thing's gonna happen.

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Or you can't su seriously suggest this, or, you know, you

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don't really mean that, do you?

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Or of course if you do that, that's gonna cause a problem here.

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He was very combative in his approach to what the screens guy was saying.

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And Scott, I have to say that the Greens mp, max Chandler,

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ma Mayther was all over it.

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He was good.

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He was one of the most impressive politicians in Australia that

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I've heard in a long, long time in terms of being over the topic.

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The detail wasn't drawn to the side issues that Spears wanted to go to.

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Brought it back where he wanted to when necessary.

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Didn't dodge the questions, gave good answers.

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I thought he was excellent.

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I think you know, cuz when before I said you know, next election, the greens are

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gonna, people are gonna listen to the greens and they're gonna feel the pain.

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And I think you grim a little bit, but I think that, that

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Max can, he can sell a story.

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If people listen to him for 10 minutes, they'll go, okay,

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that guy understands this shit.

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Like, he obviously does a lot of door knocking, talks to a lot of people,

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and he's also got a lot of stats and figures and facts right on the

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tip of his tongue ready to go and ready to throw back at David Beers.

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He's very, very good.

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Yeah, I've got noted about that.

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He was he's in Brian's electorate.

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Mm-hmm.

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Brian calls him the 12 year old.

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Right.

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One of those things, I think at the time I said that if you had teal independence up

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here, Griffith would've fallen to a teal and Brisbane would've fallen to a teal.

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And the one out in the western suburbs, which named Escapes

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me, would also have Teal Ryan.

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Ryan, yes.

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Mm-hmm.

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I don't think those three would've been picked up by the Greens, but Max has

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probably got this seat for at least two, possibly three terms, because he

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understands his electric very well.

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His electric's got a, a large number of people that live in it that don't

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own the properties they live in.

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They've got twice the number of rent of share accommodations in that, in that

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seat compared to what other seats do.

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So I think he's.

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I think he's, by giving him the housing portfolio and that sort of stuff that

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he's got with the Greens, they certainly have chosen him for the right reasons.

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He has got, he's right across the, he's right across it.

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He's got everything under control and he's really hammering it.

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Mm-hmm.

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So I think to myself, well, they've probably done the right

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thing by giving it to him.

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Yeah.

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I think people listen to him, the renters and people who aren't comfortable

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in the housing market are gonna go.

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Yep.

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That sounds good.

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So, there was an article in the shot by this guy talking about a little

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bit about that interview, basically saying how David Spears really took the

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conservative line in questioning him.

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And and, and that's, you know, yes.

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It's, you've got on the one hand, Greg Sheridan's of the world, who

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are the extreme right wingers.

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And then you've got like the David Spears and Patricia Cavalli of the

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world who are not so extreme, but they appear center because of the

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extreme right that's given so much airtime, but they're really promoting

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a, a very center righteous viewpoint.

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And this is out of the abc.

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So, so yeah, have a look at that on YouTube.

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Max Chandler Mather on Insiders was very impressive.

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And there was an article in the, in the Saturday paper this one was cost Samarius

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ended 14 years working for labor as a strategic and campaign director years ago.

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But he doesn't mind giving his old employer labor A bit of advice.

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And in a nutshell, it's this housing is a huge issue with voters.

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Labor's policy response is not cutting through and the

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greens are coming to get them.

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So he's currently part of a polling research and strategy outfit.

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And that's what the focus groups are telling him.

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And he says that for people under 45, housing is just as

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important as climate change.

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I, I think labor really is no longer the party of the people.

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Mm-hmm.

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Mm-hmm.

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And, and yeah, maybe the, the rank and file is Yeah.

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But certainly the people at the top just do not reflect the average working person.

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Yeah.

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So, so that was him.

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I won't go into that in detail.

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I think what Koons, is that a lady or a, or a bloke?

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No, it's a bloke.

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It's, yeah, it's a bloke.

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You know, I think he's I think he's hit the nail on the head

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over the Housing Future Fund.

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It's I think it's gonna be lost on the general public.

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They're not going to understand what it's about and that type of thing.

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And you know, I think Max Chandler, whatever his name is,

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you know, the 12 year old has also got a very good point there.

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He said if you, if you look at the way the Future Fund performed last year and

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you compared that to, if you compared that to the same thing on a 10 billion housing

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future fund, then you would immediately have the amount of money you were

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spending on public housing every year.

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Mm.

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You know, it's one of those things and one of the arguments that I've heard him

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say before, which was very powerfully put, he said, you know, you don't fund health,

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you don't fund education like that.

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Yes.

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Why the hell would you fund housing like that?

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Yes.

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He's very good with that.

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Yeah.

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Now that is a very good point.

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You know, I, I just, because he's saying it's a punt on the stock market.

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If it's bad idea for the stock market, then no.

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Housing not, there's no housing.

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It's funded.

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Yeah.

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Yeah.

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He says, we don't do that with other essential services.

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Mm-hmm.

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He's right.

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Yeah, I know.

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He's right.

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Yeah.

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It's one of those things, I, I think the Labor Party is trying to, you

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know, just say, look, we can be just as, we can just be as financially

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conservative as the tourist were.

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Mm-hmm.

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Yeah.

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Yeah.

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So, anyway, that's housing.

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That's Australia and the R B A.

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Let's look a little more internationally and we're gonna

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get onto Ukraine and Nazis.

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And given the transcript of what we're about to discuss, is gonna

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be referring to Nazis a lot.

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I think I'll just delete this from YouTube as soon as I finished recording it.

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Just save myself getting struck off.

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Cause clearly we couldn't talk about Jews and Nazis without

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being anti-Semitic or pro-Nazi.

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It's probably what the claim will be.

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So anyway, let's just dive in and see where we end up.

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Ah, Julia says, Scott, you can keep calling Max the 12 year old, but

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he's listening to and communicating effectively exactly what you're saying.

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Julia, I agree wholeheartedly with you.

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He's listening to them and he's making a very good point.

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Yes.

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You know, it's just something that I just, I couldn't remember his name, so

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I just referred to him as a 12 year old.

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Yes.

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Alice says, Max's whiteboard video is excellent, and Broman says Barry Jones

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labeled the Labor Party, the tepid party.

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In his last book, you can see why Julia makes the point.

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Max is a renter himself.

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He understands That's true.

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There we go.

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Okay.

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That's a reason.

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Perry Jones, the former yes.

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Science minister.

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Yeah.

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Mm-hmm.

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Yeah, he's disillusioned as well.

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Right.

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Let's talk about the Ukraine for a little bit.

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Okay.

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In New Zealand, new Zealand's National Radio broadcaster is conducting an

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internal investigation after evidence emerged that an employee had edited.

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Wire reporting on the Ukraine War to add Russia friendly phrasing.

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So instead of just taking the Reuters wire service and doing a copy and

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paste, somebody at New Zealand Radio National had the temerity to actually

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insert some words of their own.

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And there were four articles and in the articles in question,

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there was a range of amendments.

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Adding the word coup to describe the Madan revolution.

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Changing a description of Ukraine's former pro-Russian president to read pro-Russian

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elected government, adding references to a pro-western government that had been

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that had suppressed ethnic Russians.

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And on several occasions adding references to Russia's concerns

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about neo-Nazi elements.

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I mean, it's not completely over the top ridiculous added commentary.

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You know, in one article, a paragraph was added reading, the Kremlin also said

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its invasion was sparked by a failure to implement the mince agreement.

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Peace Accords designed to give Russian speakers autonomy and protection and the

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rise of a neo-Nazi element in Ukraine.

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Since a coup ousted a Russia friendly Ukrainian government in

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2014, that's all true, like Russia.

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The Kremlin also says that, I mean, that's what Kremlin says.

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There's nothing false about that.

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That is what the Kremlin side of the story is.

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And it starts off with the Kremlin also said, blah, blah, blah.

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So that was fair enough.

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Another added that Russia launched its invasion claiming that a US backed

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coup in 2014 with the help of neo-Nazis has created a threat to its borders

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and had ignited civil war that saw Russian speaking minorities persecuted.

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Well, again, it starts with Russia claims, blah, blah, blah.

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So person adding these paragraphs, at least with those things is really

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saying, well, here's what the Russians are saying, they're gonna, all the

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coals and sacked are adding that, you know, you've got to you've gotta stick

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to the, the, the accepted narrative.

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Even in the New Zealand National Radio broadcaster, heaven forbid that you,

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I mean, the number of times, I bet they have two sides, two sided, a

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story to bring in the pro and the con.

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But not on this issue.

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So I thought that was an interesting sort of censorship taking place in

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the New Zealand public broadcaster.

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Just a reminder, by the way, 2021, Maurice Payne, she canceled a former

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Australian soldier's passport because he was planning to fight with a

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notoriously neo-Nazi as of battalion.

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Do you remember that?

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Mm-hmm.

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Yeah.

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So can I remember that?

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Yeah.

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No one's allowed to suggest that there are Nazis in the Ukrainian armed forces.

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I, I was gonna say, there are Nazis in the Ukraine, the vagner battalions there.

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Yes.

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We, so we actually canceled a guy's passport and wouldn't leave,

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leave the country because he was gonna fight with the neo-Nazi as

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of battalion in the Ukrainian army.

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But now if people want to suggest there's some nasty Nazi elements in the

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Ukrainian military, just a no-go zone, like even I'd forgotten that incident.

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But this goes to show where we were thinking what we were thinking about.

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I, I remember the documentaries about the as of battalion and the Neo-Nazism.

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Mm-hmm.

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So, so there's that article about think tanks that get quoted in the

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media dealing with the Ukraine war.

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There was a study done of those and it found that media outlets have cited think

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tanks with financial backing from the defense industry 85% of the time, or seven

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times as often as think tanks that do not accept funding from Pentagon Contractors.

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And the media outlets rarely identify the conflicts of

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interests that are entailed there.

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So, so many of these think tanks funded by fence forces or contractors in military

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supplies, and they get quoted in papers and they say things that are, we need to

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spend more money on this war in supplying more munitions without being required to

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de, to declare their conflict of interest.

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Happens all the time.

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Happens on the ABC all the time where they have representatives

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from Asbe or whatever.

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Come on.

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Okay.

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We had the Nor Stream pipeline.

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Who done it.

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And the prevailing narrative was that the Russians blew up their own pipeline, but

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they could have easily just switched off.

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Now we've got the car, car, Kafka.

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Damn as Nova.

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The Nova, let's just call it the Nova.

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The Nova Nova means new.

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So Nova . Okay.

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And it's been attacked and with a result that floodwaters have now

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entered the area below the dam.

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And the prevailing narrative is that all the Russians did it.

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Yeah.

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Que bono means who benefits and well, who benefits from this?

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The people who argue the Russians did it say, The Ukrainians are about to launch an

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offensive against the Russian lines, and this is going to hamper that offensive.

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Other people would say, forces them its choke points.

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Yeah.

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Other people would say, well, the water supplies from that canal

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that's fed by that dam provides 85% of crimea's water and supplies.

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However, if Russia expected to lose the crime in peninsula mm-hmm.

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In the upcoming battle.

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Yes.

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Then it would be in their interest to cut off water supplies to the Crimea.

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Yes.

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And they have to do that before the battle even begins.

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No, the the, the reason they do it before the battle begins is to stop them

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crossing the nepro further downstream.

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Mm-hmm.

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And force them into choke points where they can put lots of reinforcement.

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Mm-hmm.

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I would've thought the Crimea is, is where Russia would, would give

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up almost any of the territory that it's gained except the Crimea, cuz

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of its importance for the shipping.

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They might, but the point was they, they realized that they couldn't keep

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the crime Crimea with Alan Bridge.

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Mm-hmm.

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So you think on the Cubo argument than the Russians did it.

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Cause they had, they had more to gain by that.

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There's also another fact, which was they'd already let

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water out of the dam Right.

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To a certain point and then they closed the gates and with the winter,

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or sorry, the spring thoughts, the gates, which the Russians control.

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Mm-hmm.

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The waters are now at the highest level they've ever been, from the

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lowest level they've ever been.

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Right?

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So the people who were controlling the amount of water

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in the dam was the Russians.

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And if you wanted to create a downstream flood to force troops into

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choke points, in other words, to stop troops crossing, then you'd want as

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much water in the dam as possible.

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I thought the Ukrainians controlled dams upstream of this one.

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Possibly.

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I dunno.

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But this particular, see I had the exact other opposite, was that in fact the

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Ukrainians had allowed extra water to flow through into the dam, the dams that

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they controlled upstream of this one.

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But then, but then, but then why didn't the Russians let the water

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out rather than building it up to the highest level possible?

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I dunno.

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Cause they'd like to have a full dam.

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I don't know.

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Somebody is saying that Chatter suggests the dam failed you to

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neglect by the Russian occupiers.

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I, I thought the seismographic monitoring had shown that it was

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actually caused by explosions.

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Mm-hmm.

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Did you hear about the interview with General Andrew Cav Ka

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Chuck in the Washington Post?

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So this is this is from the 29th of December, 2022.

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Mm-hmm.

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And he's interviewed in the Washington Post and it reads, Kacha

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considered flooding the river.

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So he's a he's the Ukrainian general of some sort.

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He said that they considered flooding the river, the Ukrainians.

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He said even conducted a test strike with Amar's launcher on one of the floodgates

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at the Nova Kaka Dam, making three holes in the metal to see if the water

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could be raised enough to stymie Russian crossings, but not flood nearby villages.

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The test was a success, he said, but the step remained a last resort he held off.

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So back in December, 2022 in an interview of the Washington Post.

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Yeah, major, a major general.

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The Ukrainian army says, you know, we thought about blowing up that dam.

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We had a test and put some holes in it.

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Well, they blew up d dam's north of Kiev to stop the, so,

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so when the, when the military.

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Flow was in the other direction with the Russians advancing.

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Mm-hmm.

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Absolutely.

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The Ukrainians thought about it.

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Mm-hmm.

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However, this is just before the Ukrainians start to do their counter

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offensive and push Russians back.

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Yeah.

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But, okay.

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The Ukrainian counter offensive mm-hmm.

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You really think it's a thing?

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Yes.

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You do.

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Yeah.

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They're not going to sit on the leopard tanks from Germany or the aprons,

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tanks from the Yanks and not use them.

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You don't think that the, what's been going on so far is that the

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Russians give up territory, allow the Ukrainians back in, bond the shit

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outta the territory and move back in.

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Like, it seems like the Russians are, are, have been mounting fairly clever strategy

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in recent times where they actually give up towns, let the Ukrainians back in, bond

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the shit out of 'em, and bond their supply lines and then, It and it sort of makes

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it easy for them to group them together.

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You, you actually, you actually think the Ukrainians are capable of

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a successful sort of counterstrike.

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They, they have unsee, they have done incredibly well so far.

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Alright.

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This is something that was supposed to be over a fortnight.

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Well, exactly.

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And, and the Russians have proved how they're on, on paper.

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They were the second biggest army in the world.

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Mm-hmm.

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And in reality there had been so much grift going on that what existed

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on paper didn't exist in reality.

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I think the Ukrainians have been taking a pounding over the last few

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months and they're just, it's a, just a meat grinder of young Ukrainian men.

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And I don't think the Russians at all are worried about it.

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Anyway, here's the point.

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I reckon there's arguments.

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See Trevor, we will have to wait and see, because I think myself,

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that it has started, but it's not a, it's not a, its full strength yet.

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They're probably probing for the Russians to find the weakest point, and

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then they're gonna smash through you.

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You've got whole battalions and that sort of stuff that are armed and equipped

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with Western material, which has not been committed to the battle yet.

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Mm-hmm.

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So once they get committed, then, then we're gonna find out who's actually right.

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Yeah.

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Here's the point.

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Mm-hmm.

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There's arguments on both sides point.

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Absolutely.

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Where there are, nobody knows really who is responsible for blowing up this, Dan.

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Yeah.

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But the prevailing narrative, if you read anything, is of all corrupt Russian.

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The Russians blew up.

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Yeah.

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And they're, you know, there's good arguments to say, well,

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actually it was the Ukrainians and that's not what you did.

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It could been either side of them.

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Either side could have blown it up.

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Yeah.

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So, that's right, but that's not what you hear.

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If you are reading the Guardian, yeah.

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Read any mainstream paper news, Western paper media source, you are getting that.

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Of course the Russians did it, and you've gotta dig around a little

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bit to find the counter arguments.

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And I'm not saying it's, it's not like Nord Stream, which to me is

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pretty clear that Russia didn't do it and the Americans did.

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After all they said they were going to.

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But it is one where you can say, look, there's arguments both ways.

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We won't know.

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You can't be sure.

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. Ah, moving on.

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Roger Waters.

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Any Roger Waters fans here?

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Yes.

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On the panel?

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Yes.

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Does he look and smell like an anti-Semite to you, Joe?

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Anybody who calls him an anti-Semite is not aware of his body of work.

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Mm-hmm.

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Well, Siria Stama, oh, I'm aware.

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Leader of the Labor Party in the uk wrote to the Board of Deputies

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of British Jews and said, thank you for bringing this to my attention.

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I found the examples listed in your letter of instances in which

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Roger Waters has clearly espoused anti-Semitic views to his audience.

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Highly disturbing.

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There is no place for anti-Semitism anywhere at any time, and those who

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hide behind the excuse that artists in the entertainment industry should not

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be held to the same standards as others are utterly wrong, blah, blah, blah.

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See, I disagree.

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He might've espoused anti-Zionist views.

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Yes.

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I don't think he's espoused anti-Semitic views.

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Of course he hasn't complete opposite, but people conflate anti-Semitism and

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anti-Zionism the same as they quote criticism Islam with Islamophobia.

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Yes.

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So it's hiding behind the religion.

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Yep.

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Or, or, sorry, hiding behind racism to avoid valid criticism.

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Yes.

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So let's just play a little bit of what's Roger Waters

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describing, what is going on here?

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Two minutes.

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The narrative that I'm an anti-Semite and that I'm promoting

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fascism by wearing a leather coat.

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And I'm cavi symbols, which are crossed hammers, by the way, S or anything

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that is literally Nazi third, Reich German, 40 years I've been to 40 years.

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Every single year, almost between 1980 and now, I've been doing bits of that show.

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Why now?

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Why suddenly now would people be picking up and going?

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He's wearing a replica of a Nazi uniform on stage.

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He's obviously glorifying the Third Reich and Nazim.

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He's doing that as part of his general attitude, which is that he hates

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Jewish people all over all the press in the Western world, everything.

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Roger Water's, antisemite glorifying nazim, wearing a thing.

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Okay.

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Well, if we could deconstruct that little bit in my piece.

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The wall at the end of the.

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Fascist bit in the film, it's Bob Gildor when he is the fascist leader.

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He's singing all this stuff, which I wrote about who they are, the forces of evil,

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and they're in the song waiting for the worms they're waiting to take over the

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world, waiting to cut out the deadwood

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Pink.

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Bob Gildor internally realizes that he's made a terrible mistake

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by wanting to become a powerful demagogue and rule the world.

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That's why he tries himself in the trial.

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He tries himself for having become a Nazi.

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So how you can transmogrify this work of theater into me glorifying the

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Third Reich and Nazim Beggar's belief.

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It's all a little bit too nuanced.

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Mm-hmm.

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For most, for many people, including Sir Keith Starer.

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Well, if he's dressed up as a Nazi, he must be antisemitic Nazi.

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It, it just reminds me of the whole Scottish comedian.

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Mm-hmm.

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We, with the dog he talked to put its paw up when he said, guess the Jews.

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Yes.

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And, and the police hunted around to find a Jewish group that could be offended

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by it so that they could prosecute him.

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Yes.

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It's just the, it, you know, it, it might have been a joke in poor taste, but the

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whole point was the, the juxtaposition of something atrocious and this cute

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little puppy doing something atrocious.

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Yes.

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It, it was no way glorifying it and, and this blatant misunderstanding

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just to make a political point.

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Mm-hmm.

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Yep.

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I've mentioned before that I feel that Tide has turned a lot on the

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state of Israel with the, with the words Apartheid really seems

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to stick as to what's going on.

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That's the way they're behaving.

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And I think that's causing damage to the Israeli cause

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worldwide in terms of acceptance.

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And so Roger Waters has a theory on why is he being attacked now when

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he's been doing this for 40 years.

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So, and he's been vocal about Palestine for the last 10 at least.

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Yes, indeed.

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So here he is, and suddenly now, You are all going, oh, it's anti-Semitic.

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It's this, it's that.

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The other why now?

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Well, I know the answer and if anybody would listen to me and you are listening

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to me, I can tell you the answer.

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The Israeli government sees me as an existential threat to their settler,

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colonials, racist, apartheid regime.

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That is why now.

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And they've done everything that they can think of to discredit me.

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I'm definitely deleting this from YouTube,

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tingling soon, saying, what is this video about?

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Please explain yourself.

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You've used these words way too much so, yeah, he speaks very well.

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Tim's a really likable guy.

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Richard Waters same.

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Right.

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Mel says, go.

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Roger Ramen says it's no accident that Israel was one of the main supporters

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of the apartheid regime in South Africa providing armament training

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to their secret police, et cetera.

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Oh, here we go.

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And Mel, not to banging on about the Labor Party, but in addition to voting

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down motion supporting Orcas the left also supported a motion to recognize

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Palestine for the Upteenth Upteenth time.

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Yep.

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There we go.

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Keep the comments coming.

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Mel was probably convincing me more and more that I should join the Labor Party.

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I'm trying to convince you to join the Greens.

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Well, you're never gonna get that to happen.

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Right.

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But we're definitely gonna help on the North Coast in the next

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election for the Labor Party as well.

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Right.

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We did Trump.

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So he's been indicted fucking idiot.

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And sometime the next 12 hours or so, he is gonna appear somewhere and he's

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gotta appear court in Miami, doesn't he?

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You, you know, if they come for Trump, they'll come for any former

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government minister that keeps classified documents in their public

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bathrooms and deliberately hides it from the authorities who ask for it.

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And he tells his lawyers to do some illegal activity to deny that it's

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there and then shows it to other people and says, of course it's classified.

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I shouldn't be showing this to you and I should cheat you for this,

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and I know I can't declassify it.

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Yes.

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Yeah, so there is an indictment, dear listener, which you

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can read on the internet.

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There'll be a link in the show notes.

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It's quite, it's, it's quite good reading actually.

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It's all politically motivated.

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Yeah, it was all the set up.

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It's not in Lee Lee's it pretty much dispels out the fact that during his

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time as president, he collected all of these documents that he took them

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with him when he left the office.

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A lot of them are about military secrets.

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It seems a lot about nuclear armaments plans, possible plans

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to attack another country.

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Weaknesses, pros and cons of the defenses of different countries,

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including the United States.

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Lots of military secretive stuff.

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And it's clear when you read the indictment that he was in a conversation

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that was recorded with his consent, cuz I think it was about a book deal

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that were discussing what he was.

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What they could do in a book deal.

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And so part of some of his most terrible admissions are like, he's telling people,

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oh, check out this secret document.

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You know, I shouldn't be showing it to you, knowing his, so that's recorded.

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Clearly, his lawyers at the time have turned on him because they have clearly

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provided evidence of conversations.

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He's, he's gonna end up in a court in Florida and the judge who's going to hear

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it, is going to be one of his appointees.

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A apparently he said to somebody, oh, they paid God, who was the

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president before him, Obama.

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Oh, they paid Obama, however many dollars for the return of these

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classified documents that he had.

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He was angling for a payout.

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From what I can understand, he took this classified information on the

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grounds that the US government were then going to pay them to get them back.

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Pay him to get them back.

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Well, okay.

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Well that was not in the indictment.

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No, it wasn't in the indictment.

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Yeah.

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It's worth reading if you got the time and Yeah.

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But it's gonna be heard in Florida and the judge hearing it is an appointee of Trump.

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The one, the one who already demanded a special moderator.

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What was it?

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The right who was the, when they originally went in to

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search through his stuff.

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Yes.

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They wanted somebody to go through and, and make sure it

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really was classified material.

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Yes.

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So the judge put this person special counsel, I can't remember.

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Yes.

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Yeah.

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So it's the same judge again that got admonished last time.

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Mm-hmm.

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So she's very pro-Trump is the pot in, in front of any.

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Half normal judge, you would say Trump is completely sunk reading the indictment.

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There's no way he could get out of it.

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It's terrible.

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He's a traitor.

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He's a complete traitor.

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Showing and keeping these documents and then, you know, the bathroom that was

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held in and the ballroom that was held in these, the facility, anybody could have

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come in and, and found these documents.

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There was a great tweet by David from conservative commentator who said, I

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was about to say he's conservative.

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Yes, any hostile foreign intelligence service that failed to steal US

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secrets from Trump's Mar-a-Lago stash owes its taxpayers a big refund.

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I reckon there would be some.

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Foreign intelligence services that didn't, and they'd be getting

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their asses kicked right now.

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Like their superiors would be saying, why didn't we have someone

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in Mar-a-Lago going through that?

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Even friendly foreign intelligence services.

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Yeah.

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Yes, sure.

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As egg, surely the Chinese hold of it, surely it was literally there's

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thousands of people would've had an opportunity to just walk through,

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unlock doors and go into these boxes.

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Incredible.

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So with any normal judge, he'd be completely sunk.

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Who knows Anything is possible with Trump.

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Who knows, but it's a very, very damning indictment.

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Hmm.

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Right.

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What else have we got?

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Cuz we're nearly at nine o'clock, which would be a good time to finish would

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be just briefly on essential poll.

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That's still holding firm with the voice at 60%.

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Yes.

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40%.

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No.

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And it's been more or less that way for the last for this

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one and the three previously.

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So I thought barely steady.

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I thought it'd just been announced this morning that the percentage for Yes.

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Had gone down below the 50% mark and the percentage for Yes,

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percentage for no had gone above 50%.

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That was on a news poll or a, or gotcha.

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A another obscure poll.

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So the essential one is being consistently now at 60%.

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So, there's that and oh, they had an interesting thing about

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social class identification.

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So, do you consider yourself to be any of the following upper

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class, middle class, working class?

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None of the above and don't know.

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So, upper class Australians, about 4%.

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I think they're upper class, 49%.

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I think they're middle class, they're 30% think they're

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working class 10%, none of these.

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So, and if you are young, you are more likely to consider

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yourself upper class and otherwise everything else was pretty similar.

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So that was essential poll for this week.

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Oh look, and just very quickly seeing with Pat Robertson.

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Oh yes, sorry.

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Pat Robertson noted Evangelical preacher in the us.

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Passed away.

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I, I saw a cartoon which had death in front of the, the grabby machine.

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You know the one you put them?

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Yeah.

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And, and pulls out Pat Robertson and goes Bloody hell.

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Can't it be Henry is, has Henry Kissinger even in this thing?

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Oh, that would've been good.

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That is good.

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Yeah.

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And then somebody else, Matt mentioned Bescon.

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Yes.

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Yes.

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All the good ones going.

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Yeah.

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Well, hat Robertson Bescon was actually mourned by President Putin.

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Yes.

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Course he was.

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Yeah.

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Pat Robertson he talked with Jerry Falwell shortly after nine 11 Bastard School.

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Blame the blamed the terrorist attack on the pagans and the abortionists and the

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feminists and the gays and the lesbians.

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He implied Hurricane Katrina was God's punishment for abortion.

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In 2010 after the Haiti earthquake that killed over a hundred thousand

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people, he said Haiti's founders brought the earthquake on themselves

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because they declared independence from France and after the Wisconsin

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Sikh shooting that killed seven people.

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He blamed it on atheists and people who hate God.

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In actual fact, that shooter was a white supremacist with ties to neo-Nazis.

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You thought Nazism would be such a thing?

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Yeah, I know.

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It's this day and age, it's really comes up everywhere.

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It's coming up everywhere in Britain, Australia, the United States and the,

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these were all countries that were, we jumped on that bandwagon first.

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The anti-fascist bandwagon.

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Yes.

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It's always been a small but vocal minority.

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Mm-hmm.

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Yeah.

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I don't have a recording, but putting mis tweet.

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Including this tweet, vice Regal songbird, Linda Hurley said to

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be hard at work on her rousing new ballot of Ben Robert Smith.

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Though insiders say she's having trouble finding a rhyme for

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amputee in the comments people have said proud military legacy.

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Good work.

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No sense of humanity.

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He murdered an amputee.

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Yes.

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So there we go.

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Let's, of course her husband was involved in Ben Robert Smith.

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So he was chief of the Australian Defense Force and appears he may

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have misled the Senate regarding a handcuffed prisoner who was shot dead

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by an Australian Special Forces Officer.

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So General David Hurley told an estimates hearing.

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It was a combat related death, but a previous secret internal defense

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report said the man was shot when the Australian officer was left

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alone in the room with the prisoner.

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So her husband has some involvement in that sort of thing.

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And I reckon that will probably do, unless you guys had something

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pressing you want to talk about.

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It's not really pressing.

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Just that bloke that sent you that complimentary email and that sort

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of stuff last week, saying that he disagreed with you on Russia.

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Yes.

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One of the mates up here.

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So Lloyd, how are you?

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And also Oh, okay.

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Special.

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Hello to Matt too.

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Cause I only just told him about the podcast.

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Yes.

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Okay.

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Very good.

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Mm-hmm.

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Well do listener.

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Our, our listenership is not increasing, so you might think of just telling

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your friends That would be good.

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You might think about becoming.

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A patron, cuz I've lost one or two in the last couple of months.

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Pretty steady, but still not growing.

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If you're not a patron and you've been listening to 15 to 20 episodes,

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you kind of know what you're getting.

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And so it does help.

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And that would be good.

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Go to the website or look at the link in the in the

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description on your podcast app.

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Pony up.

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I'm almost outta grog.

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That's it.

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And Joe's Mixer blew up the other day.

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Probably needs a new one by the sounds of it.

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So, yeah just to show your support doesn't have to be a lot.

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What else is there?

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Yeah, tell your friends.

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Need a few more listeners.

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That would be good.

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Alright, well, alright.

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And also we've got chapters.

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So if you look at your podcast app, you'll see all these things are in chapters.

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So if you like to segment, you can go back to it.

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If you wanna skip a segment, you can.

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And John says he's sharing stuff on Twitter.

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That's good, John.

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Thanks for that.

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Alright, well until next time, we will talk to you later.

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Bye for now.

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It's a good night from me and it's a good night from him.

About the Podcast

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The Iron Fist and the Velvet Glove
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